#TMC15 Reflection: Gratitude

Last week, I had the pleasure of joining 200 math educators for Twitter Math Camp (#TMC15) at Harvey Mudd.

TMC is a place with a lot of heart: part reunion, part meet up, and a whole lot of hugs and mathy goodness. Most everybody travels on their own dime. They come because they want to connect to people who have sustained them and helped them grow as teachers. They want to deepen their mathematical knowledge and expand their teaching toolkit, alongside people of goodwill.

Heart. Many of us connected to Christopher Danielson‘s admonition:

Find what you love. Do more of that.

TMC was like a re-set on me for connecting to my purpose.

And I realize that what I love is being with really thoughtful and passionate teachers. So I am grateful for that. I felt recharged after having the chance to attend workshops and learn alongside everyone. I also made some great connections to thoughtful research colleagues. We are already scheming.

Heart. Like when Fawn Nguyen made us both laugh and cry, describing what she has learned after 25 years of teaching.

I also had a chance to give a keynote. It was about how teachers can use social media to grow their own practice. I have studied math teachers’ learning extensively, mostly by listening to them talk with colleagues. I challenged myself to think about how to apply what I have learned in real life professional communities to the online space known as #MTBoS (which, I learned, we can say aloud as “mit-boss”).

Here is a link to my slides. I don’t know how much it will make sense as a slideshow. I am trying to track down the guy with the video camera in the third row so you can hear me.

So thank you to everyone who organized #TMC15, especially Lisa Henry, who knows how to build community like nobody’s business. Thank you to everybody who participated, both IRL and virtually. I look forward to continuing to learn with you.

UPDATE 1: Here is the YouTube of my talk (Part 1 and Part 2 — thanks Richard Villanueva! You can also see Fawn and Christopher’s talks on the same playlist.)

UPDATE 2: Here is a googledoc started by Jonathan Newman for us to put in common teaching problems, along with unproductive framings vs. actionable framings of those problems.